September 11/12 2009

During the last 20 years the Episcopal Evangelical Assembly has provided a regular opportunity for Evangelicals of all sorts in the Episcopal Church to come together for mutual encouragement and to challenge each other to grow in the Christian faith and life.

The 2009 EEA took place at VTS. Michael Lawson, Archdeacon of Hampstead (London) and chairman of the Church of England Evangelical Council, was keynote speaker, and gave a talk entitled “What crisis?” Relearning God’s Master Plan–Scripture, History, and the future of the Church. Click here to listen to or download this talk.

Also speaking at the conference, on the theme Of Babies and Bathwater, was the Revd Chuck Alley, Rector of St Matthew’s, Richmond.

Michael Lawson is the Archdeacon of Hampstead in the Diocese of London, and has been chairman of CEEC since January 2009. He is founder of the human rights charity, Pipe Village Trust, and makes documentary films on the plight of India’s Dalit population. Michael is married to Claire and they have three grown up girls. For more information on the Pipe Village Trust, please see http://www.pipevillagetrust.org.

The Church of England Evangelical Council was founded in 1960 to promote effective consultation between Evangelical leaders in the Church of England, in order that the evangelical heritage may be better applied to contemporary opportunities and problems in church and nation, and to encourage diocesan evangelical fellowships, societies, and other groups working within the evangelical constituency, and those working within the formal structures of the Church of England.

The Ven Michael Lawson

The Ven Michael Lawson

The Revd Chuck Alley

The Revd Chuck Alley

‘Not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near.’ Heb 10.25

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4 Responses to “Episcopal Evangelical Assembly, September 2009”

  1. Celinda Scott Says:

    Very much looking forward to the conference. Not very important to the matter of the conference, but thought I’d bring this up as an aside: I was very interested in hearing that that Archdeacon Johnson makes documentaries about the Dalit population in India. Once a year on the John Dewey listserv an Indian scholar writes to remind us that Ambedkar, who was a prime author of the Indian constitution many decades ago, was born a Dalit and inspired by Dewey at Columbia to work against the caste system. I hadn’t realized that Ambedkar and Gandhi were at cross purposes on the matter of the caste system–although Gandhi worked hard to improve the lot of the untouchables, basically he was not opposed to the traditional Hindu caste system. Ambedkar later turned to Buddhism as a way to turn the population away from traditional Hinduism and the caste system. I’m not sure why Christianity did not seem as good a way to accomplish that (have read some reasons, but they don’t seem adequate).

  2. Celinda Scott Says:

    Please excuse me, I meant Archdeacon Lawson
    in the comment above.

    1. Michael Lawson Says:

      How kind of you to write about this, Celinda. Joseph D’souza, (who has also written on Ambedkar and Gandhi) and is one of the leading authorities on Ambedkar in India, has told me that Ambedkar wished to become a Christian, but almost universally then the Church practised caste and wouldn’t have him! We can discuss more if you are coming to the conference.

  3. Philip Wainwright Says:

    We’ll get to see a presentation on the Dalit situation. See the full schedule of events at http://canterburytrail.wordpress.com/2009/09/03/evangelical-assembly-schedule/.

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